University of Wisconsin–Madison Medical College of Wisconsin

Acceptability and Preferences of Simulation-Based Continuing Education Among Emergency Medical Service Providers

Michael Mancera, MD; Nicholas Genthe, MD; Megan Gussick, MD; Michael Lohmeier, MD; Ryan Thompson, MD; Manish Shah, MD, MPH

Published online ahead of print June 23, 2022.

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ABSTRACT

Introduction: Simulation-based education (SBE) has been shown to be an effective and accepted teaching modality across multiple fields of medical education. Prehospital systems currently utilize simulation for initial training; however, few studies have determined the acceptability for simulation-based training for continued education among emergency medical service (EMS) providers.

Methods: We performed a retrospective mixed method review of data from prehospital provider evaluations of high-fidelity SBE training sessions. Survey responses included questions on a Likert scale pertaining to acceptability of the training, as well as free-text comments. Providers included a mix of crews with varying levels of training.

Results: We received a 96% response rate for providers who completed the training. Participants rated simulation as an educational tool and the overall value of the session highly for EMS providers across all levels of training with no difference among training level. All providers also indicated they would like similar training on a frequent basis in the future.

Conclusion: Simulation-based education was found to be an acceptable tool for EMS training and should be considered for use during continuing education for all levels of practicing EMS providers. In addition, EMS providers indicated a preference for participating in SBE on a frequent basis. EMS training programs should consider incorporating more frequent SBE.


Author Affiliations: BerbeeWalsh Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and UW Health, Madison, Wisconsin (Mancera, Genthe, Gussick, Lohmeier, Thompson, Shah.
Corresponding Author: Nicholas Genthe, MD, phone 608.843.9309; email ngenthe@wisc.edu; ORCID ID 0000-0002-9084-0016.
Funding/Support: None declared.
Financial Disclosures: None declared.
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